PATA 2021 SUMMIT

The PATA 2021 Summit theme focused on health providers at the centre of building clinic and community collaborations by promoting conversations between these two stakeholders. This helps to strengthen partnership and improve HIV service delivery pathways for children and adolescents so that services are better coordinated and impactful.

This exciting hybrid event took place simultaneously across 12 countries through satellite spokes organised in eSwatini, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Nigeria and Zimbabwe, as well as broadcast globally through a centralised digital platform “PATA Linking and Learning Hub”.

Summit Reruns

Day 1

Opening Prime Session
Health providers in the clinic

Africa Café 1
Health providers standing up for inclusive services for all

Africa Café 2
Tailoring transition: supporting the successful care and treatment transition journey

Special Session
Screen and support: holistic approaches to understanding and addressing gender-based violence and mental health in the context of HIV care

Day 2

Prime Session
Health providers in the community

Africa Café 1
Differentiated service delivery for children and young people: meeting their HIV needs and more

Africa Café 2
Digital solutions for integrated health services and support

Special Session
PATA REAL: Review cases, Engage peers, Access experts and Learn lessons

Day 3

Prime Session
Health providers in the conversation

Africa Café 1
Curbing the silent crisis: mitigating burnout among health providers

Africa Café 2
Do’s and don’ts of disclosure

Lekgotla Closing Session
The full picture – what does it take to invest in a brighter future for children and young people living with HIV?

Summit Resources

PATA 2021 Summit

Day 1

Inequalities and inspiration: Children and adolescents living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

Gamechangers: a country example in overcoming gaps and advancing HIV services and treatment for children and young people

Parallels and Paradoxes: a collision of pandemics leaves children and young people vulnerable